Project Management Bootcamp

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Overview

PMP certification unlocks massive opportunities for career advancement. Not only is it the top globally recognized credential for project managers, but research also shows that it can boost your salary by up to 20%.

Whether you're working towards your PMP® certification, collecting Professional Development Units (PDUs), or simply looking to improve your project management skills, this PMP certification training bootcamp will help you get there.

In a series of four foundational courses, you'll learn today's most relevant topics in project management, based on the latest Project Management Institute guidelines.

The four courses in this PMP certification training bootcamp include:

  • Project Management Framework: Build a foundation to standardize your processes and account for factors that could impact your project's execution and delivery.
  • Project Management Teams and Stakeholders: Master the art of good project communication so you can eliminate ambiguity and make decisions with confidence.
  • Project Management Planning: Discover the key project planning steps, starting with the baseline and planning through the scope, schedule, and resource phases.
  • Project Performance and Delivery: Gain the skills needed to successfully support a project through every phase to deliver desired outcomes on target and on time.

By the end of this PMP certification training, you’ll be able to:

  • Demonstrate competence in running successful projects within a specified organizational context.
  • Manage risk, innovation, and operations through traditional and Agile Scrum techniques.
  • Transform complex ideas into an organized and optimized plan using industry best practices.
  • Manage multi-disciplinary teams with seamless communication.
  • Earn 60.5 PDUs or contact hours toward your Project Management education for certification with PMI.

This course is based on The Project Management Institute, A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) - Seventh Edition, Project Management Institute, Inc., 2021.

Once enrolled, our friendly support team and tutors are here to help with course-related inquiries.


FAQ

  • People who want to prepare for the PMP® exam.
  • Project managers who want to take the next step in their careers by getting certified with PMI.
  • People who want to earn the required 35 contact hours for PMI through on-demand online training.
  • Busy professionals who want the flexibility to upskill at their own pace.
  • Existing PMI certification holders who want to earn PDUs to maintain their certification.
  • People who want the assurance of learning from an Authorized Training Partner (A.T.P.) with PMI.

For more information on how to get your PMP® certification online, including eligibility criteria, certification cost, and process, check out our handy step by step PMP® certification guide.

PMP stands for ‘Project Management Professional’. It is an internationally recognized designation by the Project Management Institute (PMI).

The PMP® certification is earned once you have passed the PMP® exam. It represents the utmost knowledge and experience in project management.

Earning the PMP certification enhances your credibility as a Project Manager, unlocks more job opportunities, increases your earning potential, gives you access to global networking opportunities, and more.

Here are the steps you need to take in order to earn a PMP® certification:

  1. Meet PMI’s prerequisites for PMP® certification of:
    • Secondary degree (high school diploma, associate’s degree or global equivalent) or four year degree.
    • Either 4,500 hours or 7,500 hours of experience leading projects, depending on your education level.
    • 35 hours of project management education. The GoSkills PMP® course meets this requirement, and GoSkills is an Authorized Training Partner (A.T.P.) with PMI.
  2. Complete the online application form.
  3. Wait for confirmation from PMI that they have received your application.
  4. Pay for the exam.
    • If you’re a PMI member, the PMP® exam will cost you $405. If you’re not a PMI member, then you’re looking at $555 to take the exam.
  5. Make an appointment to take the PMP® exam.

  6. Maintain your PMP® certification.
    • To renew your PMP® certification, you need to earn 60 PDUs over the span of three years, report your PDUs to PMI, and pay the renewal fee of $60. GoSkills project management, finance, and lean six sigma courses are a great way to earn PDUs while learning practical skills.

You can learn more about the steps to gain your PMP® certification in detail here.

If you do not hold a PMP® certification yet, you earn contact hours (also known as education hours) when you take project management training. Once you are officially certified, you earn Professional Development Units (PDUs) instead when you undertake training.

In order to take the PMP® exam, you will need a minimum of 35 contact hours. The GoSkills PMP® Certification Training course meets this requirement, awarding learners 60.5 contact hours upon completion.

Once you have earned your certification, you will need to earn 60 PDUs over the span of the next three years to maintain your certification. The GoSkills PMP® Certification Training course provides 60.5 PDUs, and you can also earn PDUs from our range of project management, lean six sigma and finance courses.

The PMP® exam is designed to test the knowledge of experienced project managers, and as such it is one of the more difficult project management certification exams.

However, it is possible to pass the exam if you thoroughly study the PMBOK Guide, specifically the five process groups and ten knowledge areas covered in the exam. A key to scoring well in the exam is answering questions with the PMBOK Guide way of doing things, not the way you may have learned to do things in practice at your job.

Taking a course like GoSkills’ PMP® Certification Training and giving yourself enough time to adequately prepare for the exam will help give you the tools you need to be confident you have the knowledge to succeed.

The PMP® exam is 230 minutes or just under 4 hours long. There are no scheduled breaks, which means the clock will keep running should you choose to take one.

There are 180 questions to answer on the PMP® exam. With the time you’re allotted this roughly works out to a minute and a half per question. You will be graded on 175 of the questions only. PMI includes 25 experimental questions in each exam to gauge their value for future exams.

Absolutely. We work with many businesses, big and small, to train and upskill their staff. Get started here or contact us with your requirements.


Summary

Skill level: Intermediate
Certificate: Yes
Lessons: 121
Accredited by: CPD
Pre-requisites: None
Versions supported: PMBOK 7th Edition
Video duration: 11h 16m
Estimated study time: 60.5h for all materials

Accreditations and approvals



Syllabus

1

Try it!

Circles of Project Management

Circles of project management are a framework for considering different project management aspects.  Based upon project and organizational considerations, some aspects may be emphasized and others de-emphasized.

2

Methods and Models

Project managers use models and methods to organize the management approach and execute the project management activities.

3

Project Tailoring

Project tailoring is the modification of a standard project management methodology to reduce risk by accommodating the unique business and project characteristics of the project.

4

Progressive Elaboration

Progressive elaboration is the principle of steadily adding detail to the project plan as more information becomes available.

5

Projects, Programs, Portfolios

Portfolios are often comprised of programs that are often comprised of projects; all of which either create or support operations.

1

Try it!

Project Management Methodology

There are many approaches to project management, each with strengths and weaknesses. Understanding the major approaches will assist the organization is the selection of the approach that is appropriate for the unique project goals and constraints.

2

Methodology Comparisons

The three approaches presented are three very different ways of managing a project.  Understanding the differences will enable a business to select the best approach for their projects.

3

Sprint-Scrum Process

The Agile/Scrum methodology is a structured project management methodology. It follows a prescribed process that includes Sprints and Scrums.

4

Try it!

Project Phases

Projects are often organized into phases.  Phases provide structure and logic to the project and aid the project team and management to track progress.

5

Project Management Domains

Understanding the domains found in the PMBOK® Guide will prepare an individual to manage a project.  These domains are universally applicable across industries and project types and are essential aspects of project management throughout the project lifecycle.

1

Positive and Negative Risk

Understand the difference between positive and negative risk. Learn the major steps of project risk management. 

2

Risk Register

The Risk Register is a table that tracks the project risk management activities.

3

Risk Identification

Risk Identification is the practice of identifying positive and negative conditions that may occur within the project and impact project objectives.

4

Risk Matrix

All project risks are not equal in their effect on a project.  Project risks that have been identified are prioritized using qualitative techniques such as the Risk Matrix.

5

Negative Risk Response

Negative Risk Response is determining what actions the project will take to address risk threats.

6

Positive Risk Response

Positive Risk Response is determining what actions the project will take to address risk opportunities.

7

Contingency and Triggers

Contingencies are potential risk response actions that will only be implemented if some triggering event or condition has shown that the risk probability has gone from unlikely to likely.

1

Project Benefits

Every project has a purpose. Determining that purpose, the benefits to the organization and how they will be measured is a fundamental principle for project success.

2

Creating a Business Case

The business case provides the business rationale, normally in financial terms, of whether the project should be done.

3

Project Charter

The Project Charter is the document that approves the initiation of the project and identifies goals, objectives, boundaries, and constraints.

4

Requirements Planning

Project requirements are often vague, incomplete, or contradictory at the time of project initiation.  Normally, additional effort is required to collect and verify the true project requirements.

5

In-Frame/Out-of-Frame

In-Frame/Out-of-Frame is a technique for clarifying project boundaries by listing both the activities and deliverables that are in scope for the project and listing the activities that are not required as part of the project.

6

Primary Constraint

The approach taken when planning a project should be based upon the primary project constraint.  Attributes of that constraint are planned first and then other aspects of the project are planned to support the primary constraint.

7

Project Selection and Approval

The organization needs to establish a management discipline for selecting and approving projects.

1

Project Governance

Project governance builds trust and confidence in project management. While there are many ways to approach governance, most organizations rely upon a Project Management Office to perform this function.

2

Compliance Categories

Project requirements encompass more than the functional requirements. There are government, industry, and organizational requirements with compliance attributes that must be managed.

3

Governance Impact

An organization and project team can take several approaches for ensuring compliance. Regardless of the approach there are significant impacts of both compliance and non-compliance.

4

PMBOK® Guide

The PMBOK® Guide is the reference document upon which much of the PMP® exam is based.  The PMBOK® Guide contains a description of project management domains, models, methods, tools, checklists, and templates.

5

Project Management Standard

A portion of the PMBOK® Guide is a standard for project management. That portion is Part 1, The Standard for Project Management of a Project.

6

PMIS and Project Management Software

The Project Management Information System (PMIS) is the method that the project manager and core team use to share and disseminate project information.  It often is based upon the use of a project management software application.

1

Stakeholders

The Project Stakeholders' support is essential for project success. Project Stakeholders set the goals for the project and will ultimately determine whether the project is considered a success or failure. 

2

Stakeholder Identification

Identifying stakeholders enables the project team to create a strategy for each that guides the communication and interaction with each stakeholder.

3

Stakeholder's Project Goals

Many stakeholders have additional goals for a project beyond the primary business goal. Understanding those goals can help the team ensure project success and maintain stakeholder support.

4

Stakeholder Influence

Every stakeholder is unique and their influence and impact on the project is likely to be unique. Understanding their perspective assists the project manager and team in structuring the project so as to obtain their support and effective decision-making on the project.

1

Project Leader

The Project Leader is responsible for ensuring the project team executes the project. 

2

Core Team

Most large projects are managed by a cross-functional core team.  Core team members have a dual responsibility; they are responsible for the project achieving its goals and they are responsible to ensure that the project complies with their function’s standards and best practices.

3

Project Team Leader

Team Leaders adapt to the business and team environment to ensure the team creates the performance or implements the change for which it was chartered.

4

Scrum Master/Product Owner

Agile Scrum projects rely on the leadership of the Scrum Master and Product Owner to assist the project team in accomplishing the project tasks. While neither of these individuals will be the project leader in a classic sense, both take on some of the typical responsibilities of project leadership that are necessary for effective project management.

5

Agile Culture

The Agile culture is a set of characteristics found in all the Agile methodologies. These characteristics are empowerment, adaptation, and a focus on performance.

6

Team Building

Project Team Building is a process that the Project Core Team normally goes through to improve team coordination and decision making.

7

Virtual Teams

It is common in today’s business environment to be a member of or lead a virtual project team.  There are several unique challenges with these teams that the project leader must be prepared to address.

8

Changing Team Members

When project team members are changed, the project leader needs to manage both the process of saying “Goodbye” to one individual and saying “Hello” to another.

9

Training Plan

The temporary and often virtual nature of projects leads to the creation of a project team who has never worked together. Effective use of project resources requires that the project resources are capable of performing the assigned tasks. A growing element of project planning is planning for project team training and in some cases team member skill training.

10

Measuring Training Outcomes

In the typical project of today, a project training plan is essential to address the challenges with project resources. At this time in the project, the impact of the training plan that was developed is assessed. In addition, changes to the project team will likely require modifications to the training approach.

1

Setting Team Goals

Teams perform better when they have clear shared goals.  One key element of good team leadership is helping your team establish team goals. This module will provide several suggested approaches for establishing goals and a set of criteria for good team goals.

2

Decision Making

Project Decision Making is the process whereby the project leader and project team decide upon project strategy, tactics, and acceptable actions.

3

Team Negotiation

Team members will often need to negotiate with each other on tasks and activities and the team leader may need to negotiate with the other managers or supervisors of team members.

4

Conflict Resolution

From time to time teams will experience conflict. When the team leader or team members are able to resolve the conflict in a positive manner, the team becomes stronger and performs better.

5

Diversity and Inclusion

Understanding and leveraging diversity can improve project team performance in many situations. An interesting aspect of diversity on projects that it includes both cultural diversity and technical diversity. Both of these should be actively managed.

6

Mentoring Teams and Stakeholders

Projects are unique and project team members are frequently changing. Project mentoring - which focuses on coaching and aligning project team members and stakeholders - is frequently required. In this case, it is less about long-term career mentoring and more about effective engagement with other project team members to ensure project objectives are met.

7

Emotional Intelligence Principles

Emotional Intelligence is a framework for improving communication and team dynamics. These principles can be used by a project manager to understand how to harness their own emotions and the emotions of others to achieve project goals.

8

Applying Emotional Intelligence

A project manager can use the principles of emotional intelligence to improve their active listening skills. In addition, the application of emotional intelligence to project team and stakeholder interactions can reduce conflict and improve alignment between individuals.

9

Situational Leadership

Project managers and core team leaders can use the framework of situational leadership to guide their interactions with team members. By assessing the readiness of team members, the project manager or core team leader can interact with a leadership style likely to improve team performance.

1

Communication Management

Project Communication Management is a very broad term that refers to all of the communication activities associated with the project. Communication is a key attribute of project management.

2

Communication Constraints

Teams rely on effective communication, yet there are many factors that can inhibit communication. When these factors are present, the team leader needs to proactively manage the team communication processes to overcome them.

3

Team Meetings

Team Meetings are a gathering of team members to discuss aspects of the project. Team pulse meetings focus on status. Team problem-solving meetings focus on problem resolution.

4

Scrum Meetings

During a Sprint, the Scrum Team meets daily at a Scrum Meeting to provide status on progress.

5

Management Meetings

Project Management Reviews are the formal documented meetings held periodically between senior management and the project team. 

6

Technical Reviews

Project technical reviews are formal decision meetings between team members and a panel of subject matter experts.

7

Sprint Demonstration Planning

Sprint Demonstration Planning ensures that the Sprint Demo meeting appropriately reflects the work accomplished by the Scrum Team.

8

Overcoming Misunderstandings

Misunderstandings frequently occur within project teams. The project leader to demonstrate and encourage effective listening and clear communication to minimize these. This lesson illustrates several best practices for avoiding misunderstandings

1

Baseline Plan

The integrated project plan that includes scope, schedule, and resource information for all aspects of the project is the project baseline plan.

2

Requirements Management

Project requirements are often vague, incomplete or contradictory at the time of project initiation.  Normally, additional effort is required to collect and verify the true project requirements.

3

Project Deliverables

Learn how to identify project tasks and activities using the deliverables deployment technique.

4

Project Boundaries

Learn how to quickly identify project boundaries using the W questions.

5

Approval and Kickoff

Once a project is approved, the project planning starts in earnest. In this lesson learn the best practices for this start of project planning are presented and discussed.

6

Work Breakdown Structure

The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) is the most commonly used technique for organizing the project scope. The WBS decomposes the scope into tasks and organizes the tasks into logical groupings.

1

WBS Dictionary

The WBS Dictionary is a table or spreadsheet that is organized by project task and contains all project planning details.

2

Task Description

Task Descriptions are the statements of scope for each of the project activities.  They are written in the format of “action – completion point.”

3

Story Cards

Story Cards - also known as Product Backlog Items (PBIs) - are the technique used for documenting project scope, quality requirements, estimates, and priority of the deliverables in an Agile/Scrum project.

4

Writing Story Cards

There is an art to creating effective story cards. In this lesson, an Agile project team member will learn the best practices for writing story cards.

5

Backlog

Requirements are managed in an Agile project using the Project Backlog. This is a prioritized list of the project deliverables.

1

Milestone Schedule

Understand when and how to use a milestone schedule on a project.  Learn how to create a milestone schedule.

2

Gantt Chart

Understand when and how to use a Gantt chart on a project. Learn how to create a Gantt chart.

3

Network Diagram

A network diagram is a project scheduling technique that shows the relationship between tasks by depicting project activities as a flowchart.

4

Task List Schedule

A Task List Schedule is a schedule format used to communicate tasks with dates to extended team members or those who do not have a major role in the project.

5

Kanban Schedule

A Kanban Schedule is a project scheduling tool for managing a batch of similar items that must be processed through the same project steps.

6

Float, Slack, Buffer

Float (slack or buffer) is extra time that a task could consume beyond its duration estimate without impacting other aspects of the project. Total float is extra time without impacting the end date of the project and free float is extra time without impacting another project task.

7

Critical Path

Critical Path is a project scheduling technique that determines the shortest time that the current project plan can be completed.

8

Sprint Controls

Sprint Controls are the planning and tracking techniques used by an Agile project team to organize the project tasks and activities.

1

Resource List

The project Resource List is a list of all individuals working on the project with their contact information and all special equipment and facilities required to accomplish project tasks.

2

Responsibility Matrix

The Responsibility Matrix is a project management tool for correlating project work assignments with project team members.

3

Using Contractors and Vendors

Contractors, vendors, and suppliers are used on projects to reduce risks.  These external resources have capacity and capability that allows them to complete project tasks better than internal resources would be able to complete them.

4

Project Budget

Understand what is normally shown in a project budget.  Learn how to create a time-phased project budget.

5

Resource Over-allocation

Project resource demands are often inconsistent throughout the life of the project leading to times when resources are over-allocated.

1

Estimating Techniques

The most commonly used techniques for creating project estimates are analogous estimates, bottom-up estimates, three-point estimates, and using a parametric model.

2

Time Box

Time Boxes are an estimating technique that sets a finite time for a task or task group. The amount of scope that is completed is variable. Whatever scope is done when the time box ends is the amount of scope for that activity on the project.

3

Effort-Duration-Money

Project estimates of effort, duration, and money are interrelated. Based upon the cost and availability of the resources involved, once you have one of the estimates, you can derive the other two.

4

Estimating Uncertainty

Project plans are built with an accumulation of estimates, each of which has a level of uncertainty associated with it.  The level of uncertainty is a major contributor to the accuracy of the plan and the amount of project risk.

1

Task Accountability

Task Accountability is the project management activity associated with ensuring the successful completion of project activities.

2

Contractor and Vendor Execution

Contractors and vendors are often used to accomplish project tasks. The complexity, uniqueness, and uncertainty of the activity will determine the nature of the relationship between the project team and the contractor or vendor.

3

Sprint Execution

Sprint execution is the actual work of the Scrum team during the Sprint to accomplish the tasks needed to complete each Story in the Sprint Backlog.

4

Quality Control - Quality Assurance

Quality management on projects are processes and tools that aid the project core team and the organization in their effort to both do the right things and do things the right way on projects. It includes a focus on both corrective actions and preventive actions.

5

Sprint Demonstration

The Sprint Demonstration is the formal meeting where the Scrum Team demonstrates to the Product Owner the performance of each deliverable that was created during the Sprint.

6

Stakeholder Acceptance

Understand how to gain stakeholder acceptance during project closeout and learn how to create and use a Punch List.

7

Verify Objectives are Met

A project is formally approved because of a business-level impact. That impact should be verified as the project nears closeout.

8

Verify Performance Improvement

In addition to completing the project goals and objectives, an attribute of project performance is the performance of the members of the project team. Each team member should have continued to develop their own skills and leadership.

1

Project Team Dysfunctions

Since project teams are comprised of people, there are times when the project team will become dysfunctional. Team members begin to violate team ground rules and team cohesion and trust are undermined. In this lesson, we discuss a framework for recognizing this and addressing dysfunctional behavior.

2

Measuring Compliance

Attributes of governance and compliance were discussed in planning. However, it is during project execution that compliance is demonstrated. In this lesson, we discuss the techniques to be used to monitor the level of compliance on a project.

3

Achieving Compliance

Depending upon your organization's culture, compliance may be a primary value or it may only be treated as a minor element of project management. In this lesson, we discuss the compliance mindset and multiple methods for strengthening compliance on your project.

4

Survey Business Environment

There are a growing number of things outside the control of the project team in today's business environment. The project manager must monitor the industry and organization to assess the impacts. Risk management has expanded to include items outside the control of the project team.

5

Confirm Project Compliance

Project compliance with all appropriate standards, regulations, policies, and requirements documents is the responsibility of the project team. However, typically an independent review of compliance, in the form of a project audit, is done to confirm compliance.

1

Project Dashboards

Learn how to create and use a project dashboard to communicate project status with both management and your project team.

2

Earned Value Planning

Earned Value Management is a comprehensive project management technique that combines scope, schedule and resource management into one set of measures.  It starts with task-level planning.

3

Setting Earned Value

Earned Value Management is a comprehensive project management technique that combines scope, schedule, and resource management into one set of measures.  An element, in fact, the element that provides the name of the technique, is the setting of Earned Value.

4

Variance Analysis

Variance occurs when the actual situation is different from the planned or expected situation.  In projects, variance analysis applies to schedule variance and cost variance.  It determines both why the actual situation is different than what was planned and the impact that will have on the project.

5

Forecasting Project Results

Since projects seldom go exactly as planned, part way through a project the project team is typically asked to estimate how much time and money are required to complete the project.

1

Issue Resolution

Issues are any request, complaint, or unexpected condition that leads to unplanned, but in scope, work that must be accomplished on a project.  They normally result in the need to implement a workaround in order to resolve them.

2

Roadblocks

Roadblocks are impediments that prevent the Scrum Team from completing Stories and tasks. The Scrum Master is charged with removing or creating a workaround for the Roadblocks.

3

Contingency and Triggers

Contingencies are potential risk response actions that will only be implemented if some triggering event or condition has shown that the risk probability has gone from unlikely to likely.

4

Scope Creep

Scope creep is the uncontrolled expansion to project scope without adjustments to time, cost, and resources.

5

Project Acceleration

There are several approaches a project team can take to accelerate project tasks. Each approach has its own unique characteristics and risks.

6

Baseline Management

The project performance is tracked against an integrated set of project baselines that support the achievement of the project’s triple constraint goals and objectives.

7

Change Planning

The unique nature of projects leads to an inherent level of uncertainty.  Project managers should expect and plan for project change.

8

Project Change

A formal documented modification to the project baseline, boundaries, or an artifact.

1

Lessons Learned

Lessons Learned are a retrospective look at a project, or phase of a project, to identify best practices to be repeated and performance gaps to be improved.

2

Retrospective

The Sprint Retrospective is a lessons learned meeting with a focus on identifying opportunities to improve the performance and management of the next Sprint. 

3

Refinement

The Backlog Refinement is the update of the Product Backlog based upon what has been completed and what has been learned in a recently completed Sprint.

4

Transition to Business

To fully realize the benefit of a project, often business systems need to change to implement the project results. This transition can be a challenging aspect of the project.

5

Final Report

In many organizations, a final report is prepared after all project activities have been completed and the impact of the project results have been demonstrated in business performance metrics.

6

Administrative Closeout

In addition to transitioning the result of the project into the organization’s operations, projects often have accounts, systems, and resources that must be closed or disposed of before the project is fully closed.

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